Recovery 2.0: Move Beyond Addiction and Upgrade Your Life – Deepak Chopra & Tom Rosen

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Recovery 2.0: Move Beyond Addiction and Upgrade Your Life – Deepak Chopra & Tom Rosen

Recovery 2.0: Move Beyond Addiction and Upgrade Your Life

In this moving conversation, Deepak and Tommy Rosen discuss the path to recovery to overcome addiction and thrive in life. Tommy shares his personal journey to wholeness through varying tools, both traditional and contemporary—including meditation and yoga.

Tommy Rosen Bio
Tommy Rosen is an internationally renowned yoga teacher and addiction recovery expert who has spent the last 3 decades immersed in recovery and wellness. He holds advanced certifications in both Kundalini and Hatha Yoga and has 29 years of continuous recovery from addiction.

Tommy is the founder and CEO of Recovery 2.0, where he has created the Recovery 2.0 Global Community, the Recovery 2.0 Online Conference series, the Recovery 2.0 Group Coaching Program and the Recovery 2.0 Coach Training Program.

Tommy also leads yoga and recovery retreats and workshops internationally spreading the message of “Don’t just survive, THRIVE.

His first book, Recovery 2.0: Move Beyond Addiction and Upgrade Your Life, (Hay House, 2014) was published to International acclaim and continues to transform the lives of readers across the globe.

*** ALL PHOTOS CREDIT: DJ PIERCE

Recovery 2.0 Website:

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About Tommy Rosen

About Tommy Rosen

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Tommy Rosen – https://www.facebook.com/TommyRosenOfficial/
Recovery 2.0 – https://www.facebook.com/Recovery2point0/
Recovery 2.0 Global Community – https://www.facebook.com/groups/Recovery2point0/

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Tommy Rosen: https://www.instagram.com/tommyrosen/

Youtube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/c/Recovery20

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6 Comments

  1. Dear master how do I move beyond extreme depression and hopeless 😩 feelings?

    • Many vices are based on (supposedly) negative moods, emotions or feelings. Whenever such feelings or emotions are REPRESSED, they accumulate in the psyche, and must necessarily be released, either externally (e.g. “blowing one’s fuse” or by the way of a “temper tantrum”), or else fester internally (thus leading to various neurotic conditions). It is recommended to find a suitable avenue to channel one’s negative emotions, rather than leaving them to fester indefinitely. Otherwise, the following advice is most beneficial.

      Whenever troublesome thoughts or feelings arise in the mind, there are usually THREE ways with which they are dealt. The negative emotions are either indulged, nullified, or replaced.
      For example, a bachelor who is obsessed with seeking a mate will either continue to contemplate means by which to find a wife (thus leading to depression), or he will deliberately try to avoid all such thoughts by negation (because he may have realized that such thoughts are upsetting him), or he will attempt to replace his obsessive thoughts with positive ones (e.g. “I’m perfectly happy without a woman in my life!”).

      HOWEVER, there is, in fact, an alternative method for dealing with negativity, and that is the only truly beneficial way – to “rest imperturbably in Awareness” or to be more pedantic and accurate, to “rest imperturbably as Awareness” (see Chapter 16). So, whenever unfavourable or unwholesome energies become apparent, it is recommended that one “focus” on the sense of the unqualified “I am”, until one is thoroughly convinced of his or her flawless nature (“svabhāva”, in Sanskrit). Thus, suffering eventually turns into continuous peace and happiness.

  2. 🐟 13. SIN (MISSING THE MARK):

    Sin is that which falls short of a mark. That mark is perfect holiness. Any thought, word, or deed predicated on SELFISH gain is sinful, and such evil thoughts and actions result in pain (and usually suffering). It seems that virtually every thought we have is motivated by self-satisfaction.

    How is sin, as defined above, distinguished from crime? Crimes are punishable offenses, whilst sins are not necessarily actions that can be judged and condemned. For example, how is a mother to punish her daughter for being prideful, unless the child’s pride MANIFESTS in an action, such as verbally-abusing her parent? Thought-crimes such as lust, greed, and pride, are largely self-harming, until they fructify in an act.

    There are SEVEN cardinal sins, that is, seven thought processes, or acts, which are intrinsically evil, and can never be justified in the sight of the Universal Law.
    They are as follows:

    GREED/avarice is the selfish desire for material wealth. One should be content with what one has been given, or with that which one has accumulated. The opposite to greed is generosity. Only the business class and ruling class are permitted to accumulate inordinate wealth, necessary to their positions in society. Business owners require capital to operate their enterprises, and kings need resources to properly rule.

    PRIDE/vanity is having an exaggerated opinion of oneself (that is, of one’s body or of one’s mental/intellectual abilities). The antithesis of pride is humility, though not a false humility. Humility is knowing one’s actual place in the hierarchy of society, whether one is a beggar, or the emperor of an entire continent. When Lord’s Krishna and Jesus declared themselves to be the God of all gods, they were being humble.

    LUST is the inordinate desire for sexual gratification. The opposite of lust is chastity of body and mind. Apart from the urge to keep oneself alive and the desire to eat and sleep, sexual desire is the most primal craving of most all animal life. However, when one’s libido is uncontrolled, it causes an imbalance to one’s psycho-physical homeostasis, as well as harm to other persons.

    ANGER is the clouding of one’s temperament for selfish reasons, which can lead to wrath, which is inflamed indignation. The antithesis of anger is serenity. Righteous anger, on the other hand, is not only morally acceptable, but may be necessary for a just society to exist.

    GLUTTONY is eating more than necessary to keep optimal health. The opposite to gluttony is continence, including controlling what kind of foods one consumes. See the final chapter in this “Final Instruction Sheet for Humanity” to understand what constitutes proper diet.

    SLOTH is being lazy, including over-sleeping. The antithesis of sloth is proper activity, that is, performing one’s duties of work, rest, and recreation. There may be times when slothful behaviour is acceptable, such as on a vacation from one’s work, or when one is ill.

    ENVY/Jealousy is hankering for material wealth, relationships, qualities, or abilities possessed by another person. The opposite to envy is contentment. Females, in particular, are guilty of jealousy. It’s almost impossible to find a woman who is totally liberated from this sin.

    Many of the above vices are based on (supposedly) negative moods, emotions or feelings. Whenever such feelings or emotions are REPRESSED, they accumulate in the psyche, and must necessarily be released, either externally (e.g. “blowing one’s fuse” or by the way of a “temper tantrum”), or else fester internally (thus leading to various neurotic conditions). It is recommended to find a suitable avenue to channel one’s negative emotions, rather than leaving them to fester indefinitely. Otherwise, the following advice is most beneficial.

    Whenever troublesome thoughts or feelings arise in the mind, there are usually THREE ways with which they are dealt. The negative emotions are either indulged, nullified, or replaced.
    For example, a bachelor who is obsessed with seeking a mate will either continue to contemplate means by which to find a wife (thus leading to depression), or he will deliberately try to avoid all such thoughts by negation (because he may have realized that such thoughts are upsetting him), or he will attempt to replace his obsessive thoughts with positive ones (e.g. “I’m perfectly happy without a woman in my life!”).

    HOWEVER, there is, in fact, an alternative method for dealing with negativity, and that is the only truly beneficial way – to “rest imperturbably in Awareness” or to be more pedantic and accurate, to “rest imperturbably as Awareness” (see Chapter 16). So, whenever unfavourable or unwholesome energies become apparent, it is recommended that one “focus” on the sense of the unqualified “I am”, until one is thoroughly convinced of his or her flawless nature (“svabhāva”, in Sanskrit). Thus, suffering eventually turns into continuous peace and happiness.

    All FEAR is derived from the fear of death, because, logically, if one has become liberated from the fear of one’s own demise, any other fear will seem trivial by comparison. Therefore, fear is symptomatic of sin.

    It is an undeniable fact that sin is an intrinsic aspect of human nature. Humanity, in general, can NEVER be free of sin, for sin and holiness is one of the many dichotomies of this dualistic universe. Even the greatest saints in history occasionally fell into sin.

    “If you’re going to do something evil, do it for a plain, honest, selfish motive – don’t do it in the name of God, because if you do, it turns you into a monster who is no longer human, a sadist, a pure destroyer.”
    Dr. Alan W. Watts,
    British-American philosopher.

    “The men the American people admire most extravagantly are the greatest liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth.”
    Henry Louis Mencken,
    American journalist and essayist.

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